Book Information

Animus Injuriandi - I
  (Desire to Offend - I)


Atila Sinke Guimarães

Describes the principal offenses against the Holy Church
made during the Council and afterwards


tiabk_AnimusInj_lg.jpg - 84382 Bytes

After having firmly established Vatican II as ambiguous in its documents, Atila Guimarães now starts to investigate the spirit of the Council, according to which those ambiguities should be understood. For this purpose, nothing could be better than to search the actual debates of the Council, the speeches of Prelates and the proposals of theologians as they wrote the documents. This is what Volume II does. In addition to key papal pronouncements, leading post-conciliar personalities are studied as well.

What is the result of this scholarly search? It is not a comforting picture!

The Author shows that many of those Prelates and theologians expressed surprisingly bitter resentments against the Catholic Church. They insult her militant past, monarchical structure, stable dogmas, coherent moral, solemn liturgy, etc. Even outrageous theories like the apologia for betrayal and the Church as a chaste prostitute are proposed by those who should defend her.

It is this shocking ensemble of offenses that is offered to the Reader under the title Animus Injuriandi I as one component of the spirit of the Council.

Guimarães also offer readers two Appendices:

Appendix I is a 77-page study showing the role of Hans Urs Von Balthasar's book Casta Meretrix (The Church as a Chaste Prostitute) in the multi-century onslaught of miserablism in the Church. This study itself is worth the price of the book!

Appendix II presents a macabre 'litany' of offenses, a listing, chapter by chapter, of the outrages being made against the Holy Church. It is entitled Improperia because it calls to mind the lamentations of the Passion.

An indispensable work for anyone who wants to understand Vatican II.

Below you will find the Table of Contents to Animus Injuriandi I and the Introduction to Appendix I


Format: Paperback, 392 pp. (A-27)
Publication Date: August 2010   

Price: $20

       

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Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

Chapter I - APOLOGIA FOR BETRAYAL

  1. Credentials of Urs von Balthasar as a Representative of the Spirit of the Council
  2. The Word Incarnate Seen as Betraying the Eternal Father
  3. God the Father Charged with Betraying Our Lord and Assigning Judas to Be His Proxy
  4. A Sentimental Eulogy of Judas
  5. Our Lord Thought to Have Died Like a Reprobate, Cursed by God the Father
  6. The Heart of Christ Betrayed God and the World
  7. Judas Hanging from the Tree, His Entrails Strewn About: A Symbol of the Church
  8. The Church Accused of Betraying Her Mission
II - THE MILITANCY OF THE CHURCH CALLED SHAMEFUL AND INFAMOUS, FAVORING A CRUEL AND SADISTIC RITE

  1. At and after the Council, Popes and Prelates Oppose the Militancy of the Church
  2. Affronts to the Holy Office and the Inquisition
  3. Offenses against the Catholic Wars and the Crusades
  4. Affronts to the Counter-Reformation and to Doctrinal Fights

III - THE SACRALITY OF THE CHURCH IDENTIFIED AS A STUPID PRETENSION, AND HER DEVOTIONS A MANIFESTATION OF FANATICISM

  1. Offenses to the Sacrality of the Church
  2. Offenses against the Apparitions and Revelations of Our Lady
  3. Marian Dogmas: Excrescence, Exaggerations and Triumphalism
  4. The Virginity of Mary Most Holy Contested
     A. Against Virginitas in Partu
     B. Against the Perpetual Virginity of Mary Most Holy
     C. Doubts about the Virginal Conception of Our Lord
  5. Other Offenses to the Immaculate Virgin
  6. Affronts to Devotion to the Saints

IV - THE CHURCH CONSIDERED NOT JUST HOLY, BUT ALSO A PROSTITUTE AND A SINNER

  1. The Note of Prostitution Supposedly Present in the Essence of the Church
  2. Sin Thought to Be Present in the Essence of the Church
  3. “A Holy and Sinning Church,” a Mitigated Version of the “Chaste Prostitute”
  4. History Allegedly Symbolized by the Union of God with a Prostitute
  5. Relations between Christ and the Church Would Be Based on the Sexual Act

V - THE CHURCH SEEN AS PHARISAIC AND NARCISSIST

VI - THE CHURCH BRANDED AS TYRANNICAL, ABSOLUTIST AND USURPING

VII - THE CHURCH SEEN AS STERILE, SCLEROTIC & OPIUM OF THE PEOPLE

VIII: HERESIES AND PAGAN ERRORS ATTRIBUTED TO THE CHURCH

  1. Heresies Are Attributed to the Church
     Monophysitism.
     Pelagianism and Jansenism
     Docetism
     Nominalism
     Deism
  2. Pagan Errors Are Attributed to the Church
     Sado-Masochism
     Stoicism
     Dualism or Manichaeism
     Positivism

IX - DEVOTION TO THE POPE LABELED ‘INSUPPORTABLE PAPOLATRY’

X - THE LANGUAGE AND THINKING OF THE CHURCH CONSIDERED ESOTERIC AND INCLINED TO MYTHS

  1. The Language of the Church Thought to Be Esoteric
  2. The Thinking of the Church Considered Based on Unprovable Myths

Chapter XI - THE CHURCH’S SEPARATION FROM THE WORLD WOULD MAKE HER A SECT AND A GHETTO; HER RELATION WITH IT, SCHIZOPHRENIC

  1. A Sect and Ghetto Church
     A. Background Criteria
     B. Progressivists Consider the Catholic Church a Sect and a Ghetto
       a. John XXIII
       b. Benedict XVI
       c. CELAM (Latin American Bishops Council)
       d. Karl Rahner
       e. Marie-Dominique Chenu
       f. Hans Küng
       g. Johann Baptist Metz
       h. Luigi Sartori
       i. Louis Bouyer
       j. Antoine Vergote
       k. Norbert Greinacher
       l. Leo von Geusau
       m. Boaventura Kloppenburg
       n. Tommaso Federici
       o. George Maloney
       p. Avery Dulles
       q. Henri Desroche
       r. Henri Fesquet
  2. The Church-World Relations before Vatican II Is Called Schizophrenic

CONCLUSION

APPENDIX I:
THE ROLE OF VON BALTHTASAR’S CASTA MERETRIX IN THE MULTI-CENTURY ONSLAUGHT OF MISERABLISM IN THE CHURCH


Part I: A Miserablist Church – Doctrinal and Historical Overview

  1. The Miserablist Position and the Catholic Position
  2. The Principal Miserablists from the Early Church to Vatican II

Part II: An Analysis of the Work Casta Meretrix

  1. Limits of this Analysis
  2. Objectives of the Book Casta Meretrix
  3. Presentation of the Thesis
  4. Observations on von Balthasar’s Method of Exposition
     A. Hegelian Method and Lack of Order
     B. Incoherence in his Use of the Church Fathers
     C. Superficiality
     D. Partiality
  5. Analysis of the Unfounded Generalizations in the Work Casta Meretrix
  • 1st Unfounded Generalization: The Husband-wife relationship
  • is the perfect expression of the relationship between God and
  • His people
  • 1st Rebuttal: The husband-wife relationship is neither the only nor the best expression of the relationship between God and His people
  • 2nd Unfounded Generalization: The symbol of the prostitute is the archetype of the Old Testament
  • 2nd Rebuttal: The symbol of the prostitute is not an archetype of the history of the Chosen People; it is an anti-archetype
  • 1st Omission: The Prophets who used the figure of the prostitute were all from the same epoch and were referring to just one apostasy
       A. Historical Reason for the Symbol of the Prostitute
       B. The Omission
  • 2nd Omission: When God refers to the Chosen People as a prostitute, He does so in great wrath and as a sign of an imminent rupture of His Covenant with them
  • 3rd Omission: In order to express the apostasy of the Jews, God used many other symbols, and not exclusively the symbol of the prostitute
  • 3rd Unfounded Generalization: Tamar and Rahab reinforce the prostitute as the archetype of the Old Testament
  • 3rd Rebuttal: The episodes of Tamar and Rahab do not support the thesis that the prostitute is the symbol of the Chosen People or of the entire Old Testament
       A. Tamar Was Not a Prostitute
       B. The Case of Rahab Did Not Represent the Chosen People
  • 4th Unfounded Generalization: The Catholic Church is the heir of the prostitute of the Old Testament
  • 4th Rebuttal: Deicide was the supreme sin of the Jews, and in this sense it was prostitution. But the Holy Church is not the heir of a prostitute synagogue, but of a holy synagogue, whose legacy was transmitted through Our Lord and a small remnant of the faithful
  • 5th Unfounded Generalization: A Great number of Church Fathers defended that the Church is a prostitute in her essence
  • 5th Rebuttal: The excerpts from the Church Fathers compiled by von Balthasar do not demonstrate that the Church is a prostitute in her essence
       A. Outlines of the Authority of the Fathers
       B. After the Protestant Heresy, It Is Inopportune to Apply the Symbol of the Prostitute to the Church
       C. Analysis of the Texts of the Church Fathers upon which Von Balthasar Bases His Thesis
  • 6th Unfounded Generalization: The sins of men make up the essence of Church
  • 6th Rebuttal: The sins of those who constitute the Church do not affect her essence
       A. Divine attributes of the Church that Make Up Her Essence
       B. Definition of the Church
       C. To What Extent Do Men Participate in the Church?    D. Conclusion on this Unfounded Generalization
   7. General Conclusion about the Book Casta Meretrix

BIBLIOGRAPHY
SUBJECT INDEX
WORD INDEX


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Read the Introduction of Appendix I

The Role of Von Balthasar's Casta Meretrix
in the Multi-Century Onslaught of Miserablism
in the Church

If the Reader tries to argue with a progressivist about the offenses presented in this Volume, especially those referring to the sacrality and sanctity of the Church, he will generally encounter an obstacle.

The progressivist will certainly present this line of reasoning:
  1. In the Church, there have always been sinners, be they among the faithful or the Hierarchs. There were even Popes who sinned and were publicly recognized as sinners. Therefore, History tells us that there are sins in the Church. Consequently, one may say that in her very nature the Church is sinful.
  2. We also find evidence of many sins in the Old Testament, and God Himself, through the mouths of the Prophets, rebuked Israel innumerable times. Referring to the whole Chosen People, God compared them to a prostitute.
  3. Thus, both in the Old and the New Covenants, the ensemble of faithful – that is, the Synagogue and the Church – can be symbolized by a prostitute.
  4. Further, it is common to find that the Church Fathers used such symbols in relation to the Church.
  5. Therefore, one can legitimately uphold that the Church is a sinner and that the prostitute is a proper symbol for her.
  6. The recognized theologian Cardinal Hans Urs von Balthasar demonstrates exactly this thesis in his book Casta Meretrix.
  7. By adopting the notion of a sinful Church, Vatican Council II only gave its blessing to an ancient tradition.
An expressive example of this argumentation is an excerpt from an article by Fr. John O’Donnel, S.J., published in The Clergy Review: (1)

“But Balthasar (at least in theory) is not unrealistic. Proof of his is found in his extensive essay on the Church as casta meretrix. In this essay of over 100 pages, Balthasar draws upon all the resources of his patristic learning to show that the Church is not only to be imaged as the virgin, mother, bride and dove, but also as the harlot. Vatican II in its document on the Church stressed that the Church in her pilgrim condition will ever stand in need of purification. This is, no doubt, a language evocative of the Reformation. In this essay Balthasar argues that, although Luther’s diatribe against the Roman Catholic Church as the whore of Babylon may strike us as scandalous, nevertheless this line of thinking is not new

“The Fathers of the Church did not hesitate to use the analogy of the Old Testament in which God took to Himself an adulterous bride in the way Osee, under divine command, took Gomer to himself and remained faithful to her in spite of her adultery. In the same way the Church of Christ is made up of pagans whose principal sin is idolatry, the worship of false gods, which the Old and New Testaments often speak of as adultery. But just as the Canaanite harlot Rahab received the soldiers of Joshua in her home and was saved by her faith in Yahweh, so the Church is made up of pagan gentiles who are saved by their faith in Christ. Thus the Church, who was once a harlot, has now become by the grace of Christ a chaste virgin. But she must always be mindful of her past lest she surrender her new-found dignity and return to her former prostitution.

But is this prostitution just a thing of the past? Is the Church, who was once a harlot, now the bride without spot and wrinkle? Or is it the case that the Church is both harlot and virgin, casta meretrix? Balthasar believes that we must indeed affirm both the immaculate sinless character of the bride and the permanent infidelities which blemish her in her pilgrim state.” (2)

Faced with this argument, our Reader could become uncomfortable and uncertain about how to respond.

To make it easier for him to answer, we decided to add this Appendix to Volume II of this Collection, which will analyze the symbol of the prostitute and the problem of a “poor Church,” or a “miserablist Church.”
*

This Appendix I does not pretend to exhaust the topic of the supposed peccability of the Church3 and of an imaginary peccantness, or sinfulness, that would exist in her very essence (n. 1 above). We intend to deal with such matters in greater detail in Volume XI of this Collection.

Nor do we intend to directly address how the Council blessed the thesis of the sinning Church (n. 7 above). This matter will be discussed in more detail also in Volume XI.

Our goal here is to situate the theme of the work Casta meretrix in a historical context and to present a refutation of it.

In so doing, we believe we will be providing the Reader with arguments to counter the objections above, as well as offering him a concrete example of the fraudulent character of the progressivist argument.
1. The article “Man and Woman as Imago Dei in the Theology of Hans Urs von Balthasar” was sent to the Author of this Volume by Fr. Edouard Hammel, S.J., professor of Moral Theology and then Vice-Rector of Gregorian University, to help to clarify the two conversations they had in Rome on this and other topics (February 2 and March 7, 1983). He would seem to endorse this line of thinking. Fr. Hammel participated in the writing of Gaudium et spes and was also a member of the International Theological Commission (ITC); in 1975 he was placed in charge of the Pontifical Commission for the Rights of Women.
2 John O’Donnel, “Man and Woman as Imago Dei in the Theology of Hans Urs von Balthasar,” The Clergy Review, n. 78, London, 1983, p. 122.
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