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The Fox and the Crow

Elaine Jordan
This Aesop's Fable is well known and reminds us to beware the flatterer. It has a application that Catholics can find useful in the spiritual life. That is, given that we are often blind to our personal defects and shortcomings, we can be fooled by others and led astray. If the crow had ackowledged its own bad voice, it would have never been fooled by the fox's praise...


fox crow
A hungry Crow stole a piece of cheese and flew with it onto the branch of a tree. Just as it was about to take the first bite, a sly Fox spied it and called from below.

“Good day, Mistress Crow, how well you are looking! How glossy your feathers, how shining your eyes! I am certain that your voice is lovely, too. Oh, if I could hear but one song from you I would surely greet you as the Queen of the Birds.”

The Crow, who was very vain, believed every word spoken by the Fox. Fluttering its wings, it lifted its head and opened its mouth to caw.

With that, the cheese dropped to the ground and was immediately snapped up by the Fox.

As it walked away, well fed and well pleased with its cleverness, the Fox called back to the Crow.

“In exchange for that delicious cheese, I will give you a bit of advice:

“Remember not to trust the flatterer who praises you falsely.”

The Crow, embarrassed and confused, swore - though somewhat later - that it would never be tricked thus again.

Posted May 10, 2014


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